Monday, 2 December 2013

Book of the Week - King and Maxwell

Former secret service agents turned private investigators, Sean King and Michelle Maxwell, return in their most surprising, personal and dangerous case to date. Michelle had chased many things in her life. As a track star and later Olympic rower, she had constantly pitted herself against others in races.

As a cop in Tennessee she had run down her share of felons fleeing the scenes of their crimes. As a Secret Service Agent she had been fleet of foot next to limos carrying important leaders. Tonight, though, she was competing against a long-legged teenager with the boundless energy and fresh knees of youth who had a substantial head start and was running like the devil was on his heels ...King and Maxwell encounter teenager Tyler Wingo when he has just received the tragic news that his soldier father has been killed in Afghanistan.

But then Tyler receives an email from his father ...after his supposed death. Sean and Michelle are hired to solve the mystery, and their investigation leads to deeper, even more troubling questions. Could Tyler's father really still be alive? Was his mission all that it seemed? Has Tyler's life been a lie, and could he be the next target?It's clear that King and Maxwell have stumbled upon something even more sinister when those in power seem intent on removing them at any cost.

Determined to help and protect Tyler, their search for the truth takes them on a perilous journey which not only puts their lives at risk but arrives at a frightening conclusion.

Monday, 25 November 2013

Book of the Week - Doctor Who

The Doctor Who 50th Anniversary Anthology is the perfect collection of adventures for Doctor Who fans. This print edition is the culmination of a year-long series of ebooks to celebrate fifty years of Doctor Who. It features eleven stories, eleven authors, eleven unique interpretations of the Doctor: his terrifying alien enemies and his time-travelling adventures.

The eleven authors involved are Eoin Colfer, Michael Scott, Marcus Segdwick, Philip Reeve, Patrick Ness, Richelle Mead, Malorie Blackman, Alex Scarrow, Charlie Higson, Derek Landy and Neil Gaiman.

Monday, 18 November 2013

Book of the Week - Tatiana

In his groundbreaking Gorky Park, Martin Cruz Smith created one of the iconic investigators of contemporary fiction, Arkady Renko. In Tatiana, Smith delivers his most ambitious and politically daring novel since. When the brilliant and fearless young reporter Tatiana Petrovna falls to her death from a sixth-floor window in Moscow in the same week that notorious mob billionaire Grisha Grigorenko is shot in the back of the head, Renko finds himself on the trail of a mystery as complex and dangerous as modern Russia itself.

The body of an elite government translator shows up on the sand dunes of Kalingrad: killed for nothing but a cryptic notebook filled with symbols. A frantic hunt begins to locate and decipher this notebook. In a fast-changing and lethal race to uncover what this translator knew, and how he planned to reveal it to the world, Renko makes a startling discovery that propels him deeper into Tatiana's past - and, at the same time, paradoxically, into Russia's future.

Monday, 11 November 2013

Book of the Week - Watch Your Back

Bestselling author Karen Rose is back with her fifteenth pulse-pounding thriller. Stevie Mazzetti knew she would never get over the murder of her husband and son. But with their killer behind bars, she was able to move on with her life, if only for her daughter's sake.
Now, eight years later, the Baltimore detective always fights for the victims she meets and when she learns that her ex-partner may have miscarried justice, Stevie's determined to right the wrong, even if it means she is in danger.  Clay Maynard has always wanted Stevie and when she is targeted by a vicious psychopath, he believes that protecting her may give him the chance to have her in his life forever. Clay will do anything to keep Stevie safe but with a killer on her tail who has everything to lose and a secret to hide, will they stay alive long enough to find happiness?

Monday, 4 November 2013

Book of the Week - Revenge

Michael Flynn is untouchable in a world of power, money and violence. He fights for what he wants and he takes it, whatever the cost. He learns the rules of the Life from the best and when his mentor, legendary Face Patrick Costello, is taken out, no one questions that Michael Flynn is his natural successor.

For Michael, loyalty - and crime - pay. Michael rises to heights beyond anything the criminal underworld has seen. He owns everyone and he rules his empire with an even but fierce hand.

No one would dare challenge him. Then the unthinkable happens. Perhaps Michael Flynn is not so untouchable after all, and he must learn that...WITHOUT THE SHEDDING OF BLOOD THERE CAN BE NO FORGIVENESS OF SINS.

Tuesday, 29 October 2013

Book of the Week - Bonkers

Bonkers: My Life in Laughs by Jennifer Saunders - the hilarious, touching life story of the iconic comedian and national treasure Jennifer Saunders' comic creations have brought joy to millions. From Comic Strip to Comic Relief, from Bolly-swilling Edina in Ab Fab to her takes on Madonna or Mamma Mia, her characters are household names. But it's Jennifer herself who has a place in all our hearts.

This is her funny, moving and frankly bonkers memoir, filled with laughter, friends and occasional heartache - but never misery. Bonkers is full of riotous adventures: accidentally enrolling on a teacher training course with a young Dawn French, bluffing her way to each BBC series, shooting Lulu, trading wild faxes with Joanna Lumley, touring India with Ruby Wax and Goldie Hawn. There's cancer, too, when she becomes 'Brave Jen'.

But her biggest battle is with the bane of her life: the Laws of Procrastination. As she admits, 'There has never been a Plan. Everything has been fairly random, happened by accident or just fallen into place.

I'm off now, to do some sweeping...' Prepare to chuckle, whoop, and go Bonkers. Jennifer Saunders is a comedian, writer and actress. She has won three Baftas (including the Bafta Fellowship), an International Emmy, a British Comedy Award, a Rose d'Or, two Writers' Guild Awards and a People's Choice Award.

She also has a certificate for coming third in the discus at the Northwich Area Sports championships, and numerous rosettes for clear round jumping and gymkhana on her pony. She lives in Devon and London with her husband Adrian Edmondson. She has three daughters who are all grown up and have left home.

They have been replaced with a whippet called Olive. She has recently been forced to become a grandmother despite only being 55. Bonkers is her first book.

Monday, 21 October 2013

Book of the Week - The 100 Most Pointless Arguments in the World

From the presenters of the hit BBC One television series Pointless and authors of The 100 Most Pointless Things in the World comes a hilarious collection of answers to some of life's biggest questions. We've all had them, those pointless arguments that are seemingly impossible to solve. We've been round in circles trying to work out what came first, the chicken or the egg? Don't get us started on the debate of what we are all here for? And you're bound to have had sleepless nights pondering which ingredient you simply can't do without in a full English Breakfast - sausage or bacon.

Well worry no more, here to help you solve some of life's biggest - and most pointless - conundrums, Alexander Armstrong and Richard Osman attempt to answer the trickiest of teasers that we all face. So, does God exist? and what is the most pointless sport - ballet or darts? With a witty and intelligent collection of stand-up pieces, quizzes, cryptic brainteasers and pointless facts and questions, Alexander Armstrong and his pointless friend Richard Osman will put the world to rights and finally answer the 100 Most Pointless Arguments in the World...Ever.

Monday, 14 October 2013

Book of the Week - The Jolly Christmas Postman

Celebrate the twentieth anniversary Allan Ahlberg's award-winning, seasonal children's picture book "The Jolly Christmas Postman!" Children can take each colourful gift out of its envelope and discover for themselves what well-known fairy-tale characters are sending to one another for Christmas! It's Christmas Eve and the Jolly Postman is delivering greetings to various fairy-tale characters - there's a card for Baby Bear, a game appropriately called 'Beware' for Red Riding Hood from Mr Wolf, a get-well jigsaw for hospitalised Humpty Dumpty and three more surprise envelopes. Allan Ahlberg has published over 100 children's books and with his late wife Janet, created many award-winning children's picture books, including "It Was a Dark and Stormy Night", "Funnybones", "Each Peach Pear Plum" and "Peepo!" "The Jolly Christmas Postman" is the seasonal sequel of, the Kate Greenaway Medal winning, "The Jolly Postman" which has sold over five million copies worldwide and remains one of the most innovative and interactive children's books available.

Monday, 7 October 2013

Book of the Week - Fork Handles

This title comes with a foreword by Ronnie Corbett. Loved by millions and collected here for the first time is the very best of Ronnie Barker's classic sketches, monologues, songs and, of course, the brilliant two-handers that he wrote for The Two Ronnies. Celebrating his genius for comic wordplay, this wonderful collection includes 'Pismonouncers Unanimous', 'An Appeal for Women' 'Swedish for Beginners' and the nation's favourite sketch, 'Fork Handles'.

As talented a writer as he was performer, Ronnie Barker was behind the best known Two Ronnies' material. His comedy writing was so prolific that he began using the pseudonym Gerald Wiley while working on Frost on Sunday, which he continued when making The Two Ronnies, so eager was he to ensure that his writing was judged on its merit alone. Showcasing the work of a true comic icon, and one of the best writers and comedians of the twentieth century, Fork Handles is every bit as warm and funny as Ronnie Barker himself.

Monday, 30 September 2013

Book of the Week - Demon Dentist

The new jaw-achingly funny novel from David Walliams, the number one bestselling author! Make your appointment if you dare...Darkness had come to the town. Strange things were happening in the dead of night. Children would put a tooth under their pillow for the tooth fairy, but in the morning they would wake up to find...a dead slug; a live spider; hundreds of earwigs creeping and crawling beneath their pillow.

Evil was at work. But who or what was behind it...? Read this book and find out!

Monday, 23 September 2013

Book of the Week - The Treasure Hunt

Montalbano opened the door to step out. But Gallo held him back, putting one hand on his arm. 'What's in there, Chief?' 'If it's what I think, it's something so horrific that it'll haunt your dreams for the rest of your life ...' When a crazed elderly man and his sister begin firing bullets from their balcony down onto the Vigata street below, Inspector Montalbano finds himself a reluctant television hero.

A few days later, when a letter arrives containing a mysterious riddle, the Inspector becomes drawn into a perplexing treasure hunt set by an anonymous challenger. As the hunt intensifies, Montalbano is relieved to be offered the assistance of Arturo Pennisi, a young man eager to witness the detective's investigative skills first hand. Fending off meddling commissioners and his irate girlfriend, Livia, the inspector will follow the treasure hunt's clues and travel from Vigata's teeming streets to its deserted outskirts: where an abandoned house overlooks a seemingly bottomless lake.

But when a horrifying crime is committed, the game must surely be laid aside. And it isn't long before Montalbano himself will be in terrible danger ...

Monday, 16 September 2013

Book of the Week - Behind the Scenes at Downton Abbey

A revealing look backstage at the hit TV show Downton Abbey. In-depth interviews give an exclusive insight into the actors' experiences on set as well as the celebrated creative team behind the award-winning drama. A lavishly illustrated book full of images from the new series including those stunning 1920s costumes, which will delight the millions of devoted Downton fans.

Step inside the props store or the hair and make-up truck and catch a glimpse of the never-before-seen secret backstage world. Expertly crafted with inside knowledge and facts, this book will delve into the inspiration behind the details seen on screen, the choice of locations, the music and much more. With a perspective from the director's chair and rare insights into filming, this is the inside track on all aspects of the making of the show.

Friday, 13 September 2013

The Big Bookshop Party

To celebrate the launch of the national Books are My Bag campaign, we are holding a Big Bookshop Party at Look into Books tomorrow, 14th September.  Here's a taster of what will be going on.

1)  Lancashire author Lynne North will be with us, signing copies of her latest children's book, Caution: Witch in Progress.  Lynne will be here from 1-4 p.m, along with 'Granny Grimthorpe' the witch.  Bring your camera and have your picture taken with a witch - free novelties for children, too!

2)  Fun, games and nibbles will be available all day.

3)  From tomorrow and while stocks last, get a free Books are My Bag canvas tote bag with every purchase of £10 or more.

We look forward to seeing you all here!

Monday, 9 September 2013

Book of the Week - Cat Sense

From John Bradshaw, one of the world's leading experts on animal behaviour, and the author of the Sunday Times Bestseller, In Defence of Dogs, Cat Sense is a scientific portrait of the true, surprising nature of cats. Worshipped as gods, feared as demonic servants, seen as both wild opportunists and beloved companions, cats often seem as unfathomable, enigmatic and magical to us today as they did in ancient times. They have lived with humans for at least ten thousand years (far earlier than the reign of the Pharaohs), and today are the most popular pet in the world.

That they now outnumber the dog, man's 'best friend', by three to one, is small wonder: at once affectionate and self-reliant, they seem to be perfectly suited to our busy 21st Century lifestyles. Yet cats still think like the wild scavengers and hunters from which they are descended - and to which they can quickly revert. Today, they face unprecedented challenges in their life with humans: from conservationists who cast them as a threat to wildlife; from other cats who they compete for territory with; and from good-intentioned owners and vets with misconceptions of what they require.

Cats need not so much our sympathy, but our understanding, if they are to continue to enjoy our companionship. The recent surge in feline science - with John Bradshaw at the forefront - means we are now better equipped to understand them than ever before. Cat Sense offers us for the first time a true picture of one of humanity's closest and most enigmatic companions.

Monday, 2 September 2013

Book of the Week - One Direction

Calling all One Direction fans! This is the only official book from 1D, charting their journey over the last year and a half - from the places they've visited and fans they've met, to their thoughts and feelings, hopes and dreams, highs and lows. It has been a phenomenal year - and this is a phenomenal story. This Christmas, there will be no other book that true One Direction fans will want! They've won dozens of awards.

They've had a bigger US debut than the Beatles. They've played Madison Square Garden, the Royal Variety Show, and sold-out venues across the globe. One Direction - just five young guys from small British towns - has truly gone global.

Now the lives of Louis, Liam, Harry, Zayn and Niall are changing beyond recognition. This year, with their own movie hitting theatres and a 133-date tour stretching across the globe, the 1D star is shining brighter than ever. How did they feel when they debuted twice at no.

1 in the US - and in 37 countries around the world? How have they kept themselves grounded? And now that they've come so far, what are their dreams for the future?In Where We Are, the boys offer you a chance to find out about this breathtaking chapter of their story, straight from the heart and in their own words. Packed with exclusive beautiful photos, backstage snapshots, hand-written annotations and brand new insights into the boys' world, Where We Are is a unique book that no fan's life is complete without - bringing the 1D story right up to date.

Tuesday, 27 August 2013

Book of the Week - Shift

This is the much anticipated prequel to bestseller Wool that takes us back to the beginnings of the silo. The full novel which brings together First, Second and Third Shift. "The next Hunger Games".

(The Sunday Times). "An epic feat of imagination. You will live in this world".

(Justin Cronin). In a future less than fifty years away, the world is still as we know it. Time continues to tick by.

The truth is that it is ticking away. A powerful few know what lies ahead. They are preparing for it.

They are trying to protect us. They are setting us on a path from which we can never return. A path that will lead to destruction; a path that will take us below ground.

The history of the silo is about to be written. Our future is about to begin.

Monday, 19 August 2013

Book of the Week - Tapas Revolution

This week, you can bring your holiday home with our book of the week - Tapas Revolution by Omar Alibhoy.

Omar Allibhoy is the new face of Spanish cooking: he's charismatic, effusive, passionate and wants to bring Spanish food to the people of the UK. Tapas Revolution is the breakthrough book on simple Spanish cookery. Using everyday storecupboard ingredients, Omar offers a new take on the classic tortilla de patatas, making this iconic dish easier than ever, and brings a twist to pinchos morunos and pollo con salsa.

With sections covering vegetables, salads, rice dishes, meat, fish, cakes and desserts, the emphasis is on simplicity of ingredients and methods - reinforcing the fact that absolutely anyone can cook this versatile and accessible food. Tapas not pasta!

Friday, 16 August 2013

Book Signing - Date for Your Diary

We are pleased to announce that Lancashire author Lynne North will be visiting Look into Books on Saturday, 14th September to sign copies of her book, Caution: Witch in Progress.

Lynne and 'Granny Grimthorpe' will be at Look into Books between 1 and 4 p.m. for this exclusive event, and Lynne will be signing copies of the book.  Lynne and 'Granny Grimthorpe' visited Look into Books a few weeks ago to organise the event and introduce her book to us.

We are looking forward to this event very much, and hope to see you all there!

Monday, 5 August 2013

Book of the Week - Red or Dead

Football fans, especially Liverpool fans, will like our book of the week.

In 1959, Liverpool Football Club were in the Second Division. Liverpool Football Club had never won the FA Cup. Fifteen seasons later, Liverpool Football Club had won three League titles, two FA Cups and the UEFA Cup.

Liverpool Football Club had become the most consistently successful team in England. And the most passionately supported club. Their manager was revered as a god.

Destined for immortality. Their manager was Bill Shankly. His job was his life.

His life was football. His football a form of socialism. Bill Shankly inspired people.

Bill Shankly transformed people. The players and the supporters. His legacy would reveberate through the ages.

In 1974, Liverpool Football Club and Bill Shankly stood on the verge of even greater success. In England and in Europe. But in 1974, Bill Shankly shocked Liverpool and football.

Bill Shankly resigned. Bill Shankly retired. Red or Dead is the story of the rise of Liverpool Football Club and Bill Shankly.

And the story of the retirement of Bill Shankly. Of one man and his work. And of the man after that work.

A man in two halves. Home and away. Red or dead.

Monday, 29 July 2013

Book of the Week - The Men Who Lost America

Our chosen book of the week is one for history buffs.

In 1781 the British Empire suffered its most devastating defeat in a war that most believed Britain ought to have won. Common wisdom has held that incompetent military commanders and political leaders in London must have been to blame, their arrogant confidence and outdated tactics proving no match for the innovative and determined Americans. But this is far from the truth.

Weaving together the personal stories of ten prominent men who directed the British dimension of the war, Andrew O'Shaughnessy dispels the myths, emerging with a very different and much richer account of the conflict - one driven by able and at times even brilliant leadership. In interlinked biographical chapters, O'Shaughnessy follows the course of the war from the perspectives of King George III, Prime Minister Lord North, military leaders including General Burgoyne, the Earl of Sandwich, and others whose stories shed new light upon our understanding of how the war unfolded. Victories were frequent, and in fact the British conquered every American city at some stage of the Revolutionary War, retaining key strongholds even during the peace negotiations.

Taking a wider lens to events, O'Shaughnessy looks past the surrender at Yorktown to British victories against the French and Spanish, demonstrating that, ultimately, many of the men who lost America would go on to save the empire.

Monday, 22 July 2013

Book of the Week - The Son

The Son by Philipp Meyer is our book of the week.

Part epic of Texas, part classic coming-of-age story, part unflinching portrait of the bloody price of power, The Son is an utterly transporting novel that maps the legacy of violence in the American West through the lives of the McCulloughs, an ambitious family as resilient and dangerous as the land they claim. Love, honour, children are sacrificed in the name of ambition, as the family becomes one of the richest powers in Texas, a dynasty of unsurpassed wealth and privilege. Yet, like all empires, the McCulloughs must eventually face the consequences of their choices.

Monday, 15 July 2013

Book of the Week

Our book of the week is Marcia Moody's biography of the Duchess of Cambridge.

Following the royal wedding, the Diamond Jubilee and the imminent birth of Kate and William's first baby, popular sentiment towards the royal family has rarely been higher. At the centre of this surge in affection is a woman who has captured the heart of a nation and who, at the side of her husband, Prince William, is ushering in a new dawn for the United Kingdom's reigning family. For, due to planned amendments to the rules of accession to the British Crown, their first child, regardless of gender, will succeed William to the throne.

This biography explores the life of the woman who has done so much to revitalize the public image of the royal family, covering her early years, her family, her time at St Andrews University and her meeting with Prince William, their early relationship and its trials, the wedding and her new official role, her style, and, of course, her pregnancy. Besides being the perfect book for admirers of this remarkable young woman, Kate: A Biography marks a crucial moment in the history of the royal line.

Tuesday, 9 July 2013

Baines Endowed Primary School

It was a pleasure and honour to be invited to a special assembly this morning at Baines Endowed Primary School, Thornton.  This year, the children have participated in the Fantastic Book Awards (FBA) scheme.  Eight Year 6 pupils have read six books over the course of the year, and worked hard to prepare an assembly to tell the rest of the school about their activities.  We were treated to book reviews, amusing animations, poetry and choreography, and, of course, the winner of the award for best book was announced by the children.  This year's winner was Gangsta Granny by David Walliams.  The children wrote a letter to David Walliams and even received a reply, which was read out in the assembly.

The participating children received a certificate and a gift pack including special vouchers to be spent at Look into Books.

It was fabulous to see the children so enthused by reading and we look forward to working with Baines Endowed on the FBA scheme in the coming year.

Monday, 8 July 2013

News, Book of the Week

Now that Independent Booksellers' Week has drawn to close, we'd like to thank you all for your continuing support, not only during IBW but for every week. 

The window display has had to be changed, but, for posterity:

Rachel Joyce, author of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry, returns with her latest novel, Perfect.  We've chosen this as our book of the week.

You can read an in-depth review in your free copy of the July issue of Booktime magazine (available to pick up in store), but here's a synopsis to whet your appetite:
In 1972, two seconds were added to time. It was in order to balance clock time with the movement of the earth. Byron Hemming knew this because James Lowe had told him and James was the cleverest boy at school.

But how could time change? The steady movement of hands around a clock was as certain as their golden futures. Then Byron's mother, late for the school run, makes a devastating mistake. Byron's perfect world is shattered.

Were those two extra seconds to blame? Can what follows ever be set right?
Don't forget that we can also supply eBooks for most eReaders.  Simply click the 'Indie eBook shop' image on the right hand sidebar.  eBook tokens are available to purchase in store.
That's all for now - let's hope for a 'perfect' week! 

Monday, 1 July 2013

Book of the Week - Wimbledon: The Official History

At the height of the nation's favourite tennis tournament, our book of the week is John Barrett's Wimbledon: The Official History.

It was to raise funds for the repair of a broken pony roller, so essential for the upkeep of the lawns at their ground in Nursery Lane, Wimbledon, that the All England Croquet Club first decided to hold a tennis tournament. From those humble beginnings in 1877 The Championships at Wimbledon have grown to become one of the world's great international sporting occasions, attended annually by some half a million fans, broadcast to almost 200 territories each year and watched by more viewers than any other tennis tournament in the world. In this lavishly illustrated third edition of the definitive Wimbledon history John Barrett has traced the process by which a small private tennis club in rural Surrey has become a multi-million pound business that is the main source of finance for British tennis.

It is a romantic story that reflects the ages, decade by decade, from the chivalrous Victorian days when the whalebone stays the ladies wore beneath their ankle-length dresses often drew blood and the gentlemen played in striped shirts, cricket caps and long stockings, to today's white-clad gladiators in functional attire befitting super-fit international athletes of the 21st century. Within these pages you will find all the game's heroes and heroines all captured in action and in repose in vivid detail through the educated lenses of the world's leading sports photographers. Wimbledon: The Official History captures as never before the magic of an annual event that is at once a dynamic sporting occasion and a cherished British institution.

Saturday, 29 June 2013

Independent Booksellers' Week 2013

It's finally arrived - Independent Booksellers' Week 2013 begins today.  The window is festooned for the occasion and we've just announced details of how you could win a £50 National Book Token in a few easy steps.

1 - Come into Look into Books

2 - Pick up a form

3 - Write a review of your favourite bok from the IBW Book Award Shortlist.  The adults' category shortlisted books are:
A Tale for the Time Being - Ruth Ozeki
Behind the Beautiful Flowers - Katherine Boo
Bring up the Bodies - Hilary Mantel
Capital - John Lanchester
Flight Behaviour - Barbara Kingsolver
HHhH - Laurent Binet
The Etymologicon - Mark Forsyth
The Song of Achilles - Madeline Miller
The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry - Rachel Joyce
Walking Home - Simon Armitage

In the children's category, the shortlisted titles are:
Dear Scarlett - Fleur Hitchcock
Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Cabin Fever - Jeff Kinney
Gangsta Granny - David Walliams
Maggot Moon - Sally Gardner
Matilda's Cat - Emily Gravett
Oh No, George! - Chris Haughton
Socks - Nick Sharratt & Elizabeth Lindsay
The Secret Hen House Theatre - Helen Peters
The Sacrifice - Charlie Higson
WARP: The Reluctant Assassin
White Dolphin - Gill Lewis
Wonder - RJ Palacio

4 - Return the form to us by 7th August 2013.  Winners will be notified by 7th September.  Good luck!

Monday, 24 June 2013

Book of the Week - The Quarry

This week, we pay tribute to Iain Banks by choosing his final novel, The Quarry to be our book of the week.

Kit doesn't know who his mother is. What he does know, however, is that his father, Guy, is dying of cancer. Feeling his death is imminent, Guy gathers around him his oldest friends - or at least the friends with the most to lose by his death.

Paul - the rising star in the Labour party who dreads the day a tape they all made at university might come to light; Alison and Robbie, corporate bunnies whose relationship is daily more fractious; Pris and Haze, once an item, now estranged, and finally Hol - friend, mentor, former lover and the only one who seemed to care. But what will happen to Kit when Guy is gone? And why isn't Kit's mother in the picture? As the friends reunite for Guy's last days, old jealousies, affairs and lies come to light as Kit watches on.

Monday, 17 June 2013

Book of the Week - Judith Kerr's Creatures

A lavishly illustrated retrospective in celebration of the 90th birthday of Judith Kerr, author of The Tiger Who Came to Tea and many other iconic books. Her story begins with the extraordinary events of her early childhood in Berlin, dramatically cut short by the rise of Hitler's Nazi Party in 1933. Judith tells of her family's struggles with language and money, and what it was like to be a German refugee in London during the war.

We see her early attempts at drawing and writing; her sketches and work from art school, and her textile designs from her first job. We hear of her life-changing meeting with her future husband, the scriptwriter Nigel Kneale, and her time at the BBC, first as a reader and then as a scriptwriter herself. Judith's career as a children's book writer and illustrator began after she had children, and over forty years on she is still producing classic picture books.

She is a rare and wonderful talent and this is a fascinating insight into the person behind the books that have been enjoyed by generations.

Monday, 10 June 2013

Book of the Week - Spook's Alice

Our book of the week for this week is one for the young and young at heart.  Local author Joseph Delaney returns with the latest installment in the Spooks collection.

A lot of dark stuff happened when I was young that I've never even told to my dearest friend, Tom Ward. Dark and scary things I hoped I had left behind for ever ...Over the years, Alice has fought evil side by side with the Spook and his apprentice, Thomas Ward. But now Alice is alone - in the realm of the dark.

And the creatures she has helped to banish there, now have the chance to take their revenge. Alice must seek the final weapon needed to destroy the Fiend for good. If she fails, the world will fall into despair and darkness.

If she succeeds, it means facing her own death at the hands of her dearest friend. But can she prevent the darkness from overtaking her over completely ...? The penultimate instalment of the Wardstone Chronicles follows Alice, Thomas Ward's loyal companion, to the most terrifying place of all.

Monday, 3 June 2013

Book of the Week - All That Is

A major new novel, his first work of fiction in seven years, from the universally acclaimed master and PEN/Faulkner winner: a sweeping, seductive love story set in the years after World War II. From his experiences as a young naval officer in battles off Okinawa, Philip Bowman returns to America and finds a position as a book editor. In a world of dinners, deals, and literary careers, Bowman finds that he fits in perfectly.

But despite his success, what eludes him is love. His first marriage goes bad, another fails to happen, and finally he meets a woman who enthrals him before setting him on a course he could never imagine for himself. Romantic and haunting, All That Is explores a life unfolding in an unforgettable world on the brink of change -- a dazzling, sometimes devastating labyrinth of love and ambition, a fiercely intimate account of the great shocks and grand pleasures of being alive.

Friday, 31 May 2013

E-books at Look into Books!

Wait!  I can buy eBooks from Look into Books now?

Yes, that's right.  Simply buy a special eBook card from the shop for any amount of your choosing between £1 and £250.  Then, simply log on to the web site.  On there, you'll find every eBook you could ever wish for.  Another great thing about the tokens is you don't have to plug your card details into the web site, so there's no risk of any hackers or other unsavoury sorts getting their hands on your bank account information.

Can I use my eBook token to buy eBooks for any device?

You can use these tokens to buy eBooks for most ereaders, smartphones, computers, tablets and to be read online.  You can't use it to purchase books on Amazon for kindle.  If you have a kindle fire with a magic app, you can buy eBooks from here.

What are the benefits of eBooks?

Ever had a case of Simply Too Many Books?  Shelves buckling under the strain of your collection of Terry Pratchetts and Lee Childs?  You want to buy more lovely books ... but you've no space and it would involve - gasp - getting rid of some of your old treasures and you just can't possibly bear to do that?  With eBooks, you can fit oodles* of your favourite books onto one slim, handy device.  Ever been on a long train journey to Milton Keynes**?  Of course, you want to take your book with you.  If you read quickly, you might even want to take more than one book with you.  With an ereader, you can take as many books as you like, and War and Peace needn't weigh you down any more than The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde.  Also, prying eyes won't know if that's really Fifty Shades of Grey that you're reading.  Although time was when you couldn't have eBooks and support your local independent bookshop at the same time, now you can do exactly that!

Okay, I've bought an eBook card and used all the funds on there to buy loads of eBooks.  Now there's no money left on there.

No problem.  Simply bring the card back into the shop, and we can top it up again.  As many times as you like.  Just like that!***

But I already have a National Book Token Gift Card, but it isn't this new eBook sort, and I'm feeling a bit left out.

Don't feel left out!  You can still go along to the web site, and use it to buy eBooks on there in exactly the same way, just as if it actually were an eBook card.  Great, hey?

I have an eBook card, and eBooks are great, but on this occasion I would like a normal book that's made from paper.

Did you know that you can still buy traditional books with your eBook card, even though it has 'eBook' written all over it?  You can!  Just bring it into the shop and spend it in the same way you would an ordinary book token.  Could anything be easier?

Wow, now I just can't wait to get started.  Do you have any recommendations for me?

There are always book recommendations on  And don't forget to keep checking the Look into Books blog for news of our book of the week.

*scientific term
** or, indeed, anywhere
*** apologies to Tommy Cooper

Tuesday, 28 May 2013

Book of the Week - Goddess

This week, we have chosen the third book in the Starcrossed series by Josephine Angelini to be our book of the week.

She must rise, or they will fall ...Helen's powers are increasing--and so is the distance between her and her mortal friends. To make matters worse, the Oracle reveals that a dangerous traitor is lurking among them, and all fingers point to Orion. Still unsure whether she loves him or Lucas, Helen is forced to make a terrifying decision, or risk all-out war.

Monday, 20 May 2013

Book of the Week - Tour de France 100

First staged in 1903, the Tour de France lasts three weeks every July and takes approximately 200 competitors through over 3600km of varied terrain, including testing mountain stages. The race is broken into one-day 'stages', with the overall leader wearing the fabled yellow jersey. Tour de France 100 celebrates 110 years of the Tour and publishes in the run up to the 100th race.

 This book captures key visual moments in its history, including heroes of the race, great rivalries, moments of high drama, accidents and scandals, all accompanied by Richard Moore's authoritative text that illuminates and expands upon the superb imagery.

Monday, 13 May 2013

Book of the Week - The Devonshires

It's the first normal Monday for a couple of weeks.  Boo!  It's not all bad news, though, as it does mean that we have a new book of the week for you.  This week, we've selected The Devonshires - The Story of a Family and a Nation by Roy Hattersley.

The story of the Devonshires is the story of Britain. William Cavendish, the father of the first Earl, dissolved monasteries for Henry VIII. Bess, his second wife, was gaoler-companion to Mary Queen of Scots during her long imprisonment in England.

Arbella Stuart, their granddaughter, was a heartbeat away from the throne of England and their grandson, Lord General of the North, fought to save the crown for Charles I. Fifty years later, the First Duke of Devonshire conspired to depose James II, and make William of Orange king. For the next two centuries the Devonshires were at the heart of fashionable society and the centre of political power.

The Fourth Duke became prime minister and Georgiana, wife of the Fifth, scandalised even the Regency. Spencer Compton, the last of the great Devonshires, was three times offered the preimership, and three times refused it. Even the Devonshire servants made history.

Joseph Paxton was their gardner and Thomas Hobbes was the family tutor. With the help of previously unpublished material from the Chatsworth archives, The Devonshires reveals how the dynasty made and lost fortunes, fought and fornicated, built great houses, patronised the arts and pioneered the railways, made great scientific discoveries, and, in the end, came to terms with changing times. It is popular history at its very best.

Monday, 22 April 2013

Book of the Week - BBC Proms Guide 2013

This week, we have chosen the BBC Proms Guide 2013 as our book of the week.

Running from 12th July to 7th September, the Proms enters its 119th year.  Whether you're a first-time visitor or an experienced Prommer, plan your summer through the 2013 BBC Proms season with the official Proms Guide. It contains: brand-new articles on featured composers, insights on performers, new music and Proms Plus events; introduction to the season from Roger Wright, Director of the BBC Proms and Controller of BBC Radio 3; full listings for every concert and event; repertoire, performers, time, location, ticket and broadcast information; and, details on how to book tickets. With beautiful photographs and images throughout, this official Proms Guide is the most comprehensive way to plan your summer's Proms visiting, watching and listening.

Monday, 15 April 2013

Book of the Week - The Hit

It's a glorious day today (at last - we've waited long enough!) and as it's Monday, it's time for our new book of the week.  This week, we recommend The Hit by David Baldacci.
When government hit man Will Robie is given his next target he knows he's about to embark on his toughest mission yet. He is tasked with killing one of their own, following evidence to suggest that fellow assassin Jessica Reel has been turned. She's leaving a trail of death in her wake including her handler.

Today, our man David is at the London Book Fair, where he'll be rubbing shoulders with other booksellers, suppliers, publishers, and maybe even a few authors too.  I'm sure he'll come back with details on all the most important books that are being published for the rest of the year.

Have a great day!

Thursday, 11 April 2013

Books Published Today

Wow, there are so many books out today that we don't really know where to begin.  Here's the lowdown on just some of the new goodies out today.

Firstly, for the cricket fans, we've got the 150th Wisden Cricketers' Almanack and the 2013 Playfair Cricket Annual.

Wisden 2013 - the 150th edition - contains coverage of every first-class game in every cricket nation, and reports and scorecards for all Tests and ODIs. Including the eagerly awaited Notes by the Editor, the Cricketers of the Year awards, and some of the finest sports writing of the year - such as the brilliant obituaries - together with trenchant opinion, compelling features and comprehensive records, Wisden Cricketers' Almanack truly is a "must-have" for every cricket fan. A perennial bestseller in the UK.
It was the upset to end all upsets. On 8 April 1967 at Aintree racecourse in Liverpool, a 100-1 outsider in peculiar blinkers sidestepped chaos extraordinary even by the Grand National's standards and won the world's toughest steeplechase. The jumps-racing establishment - and Gregory Peck, the Hollywood actor whose much-fancied horse was reduced to the status of an also-ran - took a dim view.
 But Foinavon, the dogged victor, and Susie, the white nanny goat who accompanied him everywhere, became instant celebrities. Within days, the traffic was being stopped for them in front of Buckingham Palace en route to an audience with the Duchess of Kent. Fan mail arrived addressed to 'Foinavon, England'.
 According to John Kempton, Foinavon's trainer, the 1967 race 'reminded everyone that the National was part of our heritage'. Foinavon's Grand National victory has become as much a part of British sporting folklore as the England football team's one and only World Cup win the previous year. The race has even spawned its own mythology, with the winner portrayed as a horse so useless that not even its owner or trainer could be bothered to come to Liverpool to see him run.
 Yet remarkably the real story of how Foinavon emerged from an obscure yard near the ancient Ridgeway to pull off one of the most talked-about victories in horseracing history has never been told. Based on original interviews with scores of people who were at Aintree on that rainswept day, or whose lives were in some way touched by the shock result, this book uses the story of this extraordinary race to explore why the Grand National holds tens of millions of people spellbound, year after year, for ten minutes on a Saturday afternoon in early spring.

"My Animals and Other Family" by Clare Balding is a funny, brave, tender story of self-discovery. 'I had spent most of my childhood thinking I was a dog, and suspect I had aged in dog years.' Clare Balding grew up in a rather unusual household. Her father a champion trainer, she shared her life with more than 100 thoroughbred racehorses, mares, foals and ponies, as well as an ever-present pack of boxers and lurchers.
 As a toddler she would happily ride the legendary Mill Reef and take breakfast with the Queen. She and her younger brother came very low down the pecking order. Left to their own devices, they had to learn life's toughest lessons through the animals, and through their adventures in the stables and the idyllic Hampshire Downs.
 From the protective Candy to the pot-bellied Valkyrie and the frisky Hattie, each horse and each dog had their own character and their own special part to play. The running family joke was that "women ain't people". Clare had to prove them wrong, to make her voice heard - but first she had to make sure she had something to say.
For more than twelve years, she has hiked across the countryside for the BBC Radio 4 series Ramblings. Clare has presented "Countryfile", "Britain's Hidden Heritage", "Britain By Bike", "Crufts", and "Famous & Fearless", and has appeared on "QI", "Have I Got News for You" and "Sport Relief". She has been voted RTS Sports Presenter of the Year and Racing Broadcaster of the Year.  Now out in paperback.
This is the perfect book for you if you are one of the many people who feel that gardening could be your ultimate pleasure if only you knew just that little bit more about it. The Daily Telegraph's much-loved columnist Helen Yemm manages to strike a happy balance between giving you enough information to get you going and not so much that it scares you or puts you off entirely. She dispenses invaluable advice, minus the mumbo jumbo, with refreshing humour and a clear understanding that not everyone has the wherewithal, in terms of time and finances, to spend every possible moment in the garden.
 So if you find yourself padding about your plot in your nightclothes without really knowing what to do, Gardening in Pyjamas will provide you with all the essential facts to nurture your growing passion.
Not just a name on a yoghurt pot, Yeo Valley is a real organic farm in the picturesque West Country. In this stunning book the family behind this very twenty-first-century farm serve up a slice of the good life, with a collection of over 100 mouthwatering recipes inspired by the traditions of the British farmhouse kitchen. From soups and pates to stews, casseroles, roasts, and pies, and from tarts and crumbles to puddings, cakes, breads, jams and chutneys, seasonal produce from the kitchen garden and rural surroundings is used to present a wonderful range of simple, heartwarming and tasty dishes.
 Informed by rural Britain's superb culinary heritage but given a modern twist, recipes range from Cheddar Farls Stuffed with Fried Eggs and Crispy Bacon to Broad Bean Hummus Toasts, Somerset Scrumpy Cake to Eton Mess Semifreddo, capturing the true taste of today's country cooking and bringing the fresh ingredients and seasonal flavours of a farmhouse kitchen into your own home. Stuffed full of details on selecting the best ingredients, eating seasonally and foraging, this book is an invaluable source of information as well as a delicious collection of recipes. Journeying from the dairy, farmyard and vegetable garden into the fields, hedgerows and woods and back to the kitchen to prepare a feast of home-grown produce, wild foods and quality local ingredients Yeo Valley's The Great British Farmhouse Cookbook is a celebration of modern country living and how to get involved with the land and the food you eat.
Three killers are on the rampage in the capital and dead bodies are piling up almost as fast as the police can count them. Alex Cross is in charge of all three investigations and has never been under more pressure. But with a crisis at home that threatens to tear his family apart, Alex's attention is divided.
 While Cross tracks the killers, he doesn't notice that someone is tracking him. Can Alex unravel the cases and find the killers in time? Or will he be the next dead body on the list?
Flavia Albia is the adopted daughter of a famous investigating family. In defiance of tradition, she lives alone on the colourful Aventine Hill, and battles out a solo career in a male-dominated world. As a woman and an outsider, Albia has special insight into the best, and worst, of life in ancient Rome.
 A female client dies in mysterious circumstances. Albia investigates and discovers there have been many other strange deaths all over the city, yet she is warned off by the authorities. The vigils are incompetent.
 The local magistrate is otherwise engaged, organising the Games of Ceres, notorious for its ancient fox-burning ritual. Even Albia herself is preoccupied with a new love affair: Andronicus, an attractive archivist, offers all that a love-starved young widow can want, even though she knows better than to take him home to meet the parents...As the festival progresses, her neighbourhood descends into mayhem and becomes the heartless killer's territory. While Albia and her allies search for him, he stalks them through familiar byways and brings murder ever closer to home.
 The Ides of April is vintage Lindsey Davis, offering wit, intrigue, action and a brilliant new heroine who promises to be as celebrated as Marcus Didius Falco and Helena Justina, her fictional predecessors.
The fourth book in the Science of Discworld series, and this time around dealing with The Really Big Questions, Terry Pratchett's brilliant new Discworld story. Judgement Day is annotated with very big footnotes (the interleaving chapters) by mathematician Ian Stewart and biologist Jack Cohen, to bring you a mind-mangling combination of fiction, cutting-edge science and philosophy. Marjorie Daw is a librarian, and takes her job - and indeed the truth of words - very seriously.
 She doesn't know it, but her world and ours - Roundworld - is in big trouble. On Discworld, a colossal row is brewing. The Wizards of Unseen University feel responsible for Roundworld (as one would for a pet gerbil).
 After all, they brought it into existence by bungling an experiment in Quantum ThaumoDynamics. But legal action is being brought against them by Omnians, who say that the Wizards' god-like actions make a mockery of their noble religion. As the finest legal brains in Discworld (a zombie and a priest) gird their loins to do battle - and when the Great Big Thing in the High Energy Magic Laboratory is switched on - Marjorie Daw finds herself thrown across the multiverse and right in the middle of the whole explosive affair.

As God, the Universe and, frankly, Everything Else is investigated by the trio, you can expect world-bearing elephants, quantum gravity in the Escher-verse, evolutionary design, eternal inflation, dark matter, disbelief systems - and an in-depth study of how to invent a better mousetrap.

The reluctant assassin is Riley, a Victorian boy who is suddenly plucked from his own time and whisked into the twenty-first century, accused of murder and on the run. Riley has been pulled into the FBI's covert W.A.R.P. operation (Witness Anonymous Relocation Program).

 He and young FBI Agent Chevie Savano are forced to flee terrifying assassin-for-hire Albert Garrick, who pursues Riley through time and will not stop until he has hunted him down. Barely staying one step ahead, Riley and Chevie must stay alive and stop Garrick returning to his own time with knowledge and power that could change the world forever.

Monday, 8 April 2013

Book of the Week - The Golden Egg

Twenty-one years ago, when a conductor was poisoned and the Questura sent a man to investigate, readers first met Commissario Guido Brunetti. Since 1992's Death at La Fenice, Donna Leon and her shrewd, sophisticated, and compassionate investigator have been delighting readers around the world. For her millions of fans, Leon's novels have opened a window into the private Venice of her citizens, a world of incomparable beauty, family intimacy, shocking crime, and insidious corruption.

This internationally acclaimed, bestselling series is widely considered one of the best ever written, and William Heinemann is thrilled to be publishing the twenty-second installment, The Golden Egg, in April 2013. When making routine enquiries into a possible bribery case that could embarrass the mayor - a humiliation Vice-Questore Patta is very keen to avoid - Commissario Brunetti receives a call from his wife, Paola, who is evidently very upset. The middle-aged deaf mute with the mental age of a child who helped out at the Brunetti's dry cleaners has been found dead - an 'accidental' overdose of his mother's sleeping pills - and for some reason Paola is distraught by the news.

To the neighbourhood he was just the 'boy' who helped out, but nobody knew much about him - not even his name. That a soul could have lived such a joyless life is too much for Paola to bear, and she asks Guido if he can find out what happened. It is a surprise to Brunetti just how little was known about this man-child - there are no official records to show he even existed.

The man's mother is angry and contradictory when questioned about his death, and Brunetti senses that there much more to the story than she is willing to tell. With the help of Inspector Vianello and the ever-resourceful Signorina Elettra, perhaps Brunetti can get to the truth and find some measure of solace.

Monday, 25 March 2013

Book of the Week - The Secret Museum

This week's book of the week is The Secret Museum, by Molly Oldfield.

The Secret Museum is a unique treasure trove of the most intriguing artifacts hidden away in museum archives from all over the world - curated, brought to light, and brought to life by Molly Oldfield in a beautifully illustrated collection. Who knows what's hidden from view? Locked away in cabinets, secure storage and aircraft hangars. Most of a museum's collection never gets seen.

It sits in the quiet dark of an archive waiting for a treasure hunter or obsessive researcher to root out its very existence. Under the streets of Manhattan priceless books are shelved; brick outbuildings in London's East End house drawers of Victorian embroidery remembering foundlings long ago dead; body bags in Washington clothe space suits covered in real moon dust and in an unvisited aircraft hangar sits Auguste Piccard's extraordinary invention, the balloon gondola...This and many other extraordinary inventions, legacies, discoveries and artefacts have been visited and curated by Molly Oldfield into a Secret Museum. Rich in atmosphere and anecdote, suffused with the surprising emotion of a personal discovery, but grounded in fascinating factual detail, this is a unique and beautifully illustrated book.

The Secret Museum reveals sixty unknown artefacts and stories from all five continents, from Rome to Rio and Boston to Berlin. And like the very best mornings spent at a museum it promises to be idiosyncratic, surprising and enormously good fun. The Artefacts in the book include: An original Gutenberg Bible printed on vellum, Harrison Schmitt's Space Suit, A piece of Newton's Apple Tree, Van Gogh's Sketchbooks, The original drawings of Wimbledon's Centre Court, Dickens' letter opener,Three pieces of Mars, and much more...

Monday, 18 March 2013

Book of the Week - The Last Runaway

Our book of the week this time is The Last Runaway, by Tracy Chevalier.

When modest Quaker Honor Bright sails from Bristol with her sister, she is fleeing heartache for a new life in America, far from home. But tragedy leaves her alone and vulnerable, torn between two worlds and dependent on the kindness of strangers.

Life in 1850s Ohio is precarious and unsentimental. The sun is too hot, the thunderstorms too violent, the snow too deep. The roads are spattered with mud and spit.

The woods are home to skunks and porcupines and raccoons. They also shelter slaves escaping north to freedom. Should Honor hide runaways from the ruthless men who hunt them down? The Quaker community she has joined may oppose slavery in principle, but does it have the courage to help her defy the law? As she struggles to find her place and her voice, Honor must decide what she is willing to risk for her beliefs.

Set in the tangled forests and sunlit cornfields of Ohio, Tracy Chevalier's vivid novel is the story of bad men and spirited women, surprising marriages and unlikely friendships, and the remarkable power of defiance.

We've got a big week in store, being fitted out for magazines tomorrow and stock scheduled to arrive on Wednesday.  We're really excited about the new path we're taking, and even more so because this is just one step along the way.  Don't forget we are open all day, 9 'til 5, Monday to Saturday so why not come down and visit us?  We look forward to meeting you soon.

Monday, 11 March 2013

Book of the Week - F1

It's Monday, it's cold, but it's sunny and we have a new book of the week.  As we start a new Formula One season this weekend (Karen is beside herself with excitement), our book of the week is the Official BBC Sport Guide to Formula One 2013.  It's the world's best-selling Grand Prix handbook, with details of all the circuits and a run down of every race last season.  We'd love to be able to bring you a picture of the cover, but the publicity shots are all of an earlier version, depicting Lewis Hamilton in his McLaren overalls, and that was designed at a time when the publishers were obviously anticipating Fernando Alonso winning the drivers' championship.  The cover of the actual book is more accurate, and nicer.

We're ready for many books coming out later this week, including new novels by Jeffrey Archer and Andrea Camilleri, amongst others.

Monday, 4 March 2013

Book of the Week - Great Curries

Yes, those Hairy Bikers are back - this time with a fantastic collection of their favourite curries.  As well as curries from around the world, this book contains recipes for starters, pickles and chutneys - everything you can think of for a spicy feast.  We're delighted to have chosen this for our book of the week.

Don't forget, this Sunday is Mothering Sunday, so why not come down and find a nice book (or poster ... or mug ... or book token) that your mum will love.  We're open 9-5, Monday to Saturday.

Until next time!

Monday, 25 February 2013

Book of the Week: Worlds of Arthur

Our book of the week for this week is Worlds of Arthur, Facts and Fictions of the Dark Ages by Guy Halsall.

King Arthur is probably the most famous and certainly the most legendary medieval king. From the early ninth century through the middle ages, to the Arthurian romances of Victorian times, the tales of this legendary figure have blossomed and multiplied. And in more recent times, there has been a continuous stream of books claiming to have discovered the 'facts' about, or to unlock the secret or truth behind, the 'once and future king'.

Broadly speaking, there are two Arthurs. On the one hand is the traditional 'historical' Arthur, waging a doomed struggle to save Roman civilization against the relentless Anglo-Saxon tide during the darkest years of the Dark Ages. On the other is the Arthur of myth and legend - accompanied by a host of equally legendary people, places, and stories: Lancelot, Guinevere, Galahad and Gawain, Merlin, Excalibur, the Lady in the Lake, the Sword in the Stone, Camelot, the Round Table.

The big problem with all this is that 'King Arthur' might well never have existed. And if he did exist, it is next to impossible to say anything at all about him. As this challenging new look at the Arthur legend makes clear, all books claiming to reveal 'the truth' behind King Arthur can safely be ignored.

Not only the 'red herrings' in the abundant pseudo-historical accounts, even the 'historical' Arthur is largely a figment of the imagination: the evidence that we have - whether written or archaeological - is simply incapable of telling us anything detailed about the Britain in which he is supposed to have lived, fought, and died. The truth, as Guy Halsall reveals in this fascinating investigation, is both radically different - and also a good deal more intriguing.